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Re: [Full-disclosure] RE :OT - Don't fuck with n3td3v

From: n3td3v <xploitable_at_nospam>
Date: Wed May 07 2008 - 17:55:17 GMT
To: full-disclosure@lists.grok.org.uk


On Wed, May 7, 2008 at 6:31 PM, G D Fuego <gdfuego@gmail.com> wrote:
> Wow. That is a spot on description of how you ate treating HD Moore and
> David Litchfield.

I mentioned a project HD Moore is working on called Metasploit and questioned weather he had managed to pick up any government contracts. I said in my opinion Metasploit is a script kiddie tool. I can't see any cyberstalking there.

Secondly, I said David Litchfield's research was responsible for the SQL Slammer Worm and its a perfect example of why Responsible Disclosure is needed. Again, I can't see any Cyberstalking there.

All the best,

n3td3v

> On May 7, 2008, at 12:36 PM, n3td3v <xploitable@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >
> >
> >
> > On Wed, May 7, 2008 at 4:43 PM, <Valdis.Kletnieks@vt.edu> wrote:
> >
> > > On Wed, 07 May 2008 16:24:45 BST, n3td3v said:
> > >
> > >
> > > > And you suffer from slanderous libelous defamation disability
> > > > disorder, a new disorder I have made up for idiots on Full-Disclosure.
> > > >
> > >
> > > So you're saying he's suffering from a disorder that causes a disability
> in how
> > > well he can slander, libel, and defame somebody? If so, you should be
> glad
> > > that you weren't slandered by somebody *not* suffering from it....
> > >
> >
> > Maybe not, but the situation currently on Full-Disclosure is this...
> >
> > False accusations. Many cyberstalkers try to damage the reputation of
> > their victim and turn other people against them. They post false
> > information about them on websites. They may set up their own
> > websites, blogs or user pages for this purpose. They post allegations
> > about the victim to newsgroups, chat rooms or other sites that allow
> > public contributions, such as Wikipedia or Amazon.com.[4]
> >
> > Attempts to gather information about the victim. Cyberstalkers may
> > approach their victim's friends, family and work colleagues to obtain
> > personal information. They may advertise for information on the
> > Internet, or hire a private detective. They often will monitor the
> > victim's online activities and attempt to trace their IP address in an
> > effort to gather more information about their victims. [5]
> >
> > Encouraging others to harass the victim. Many cyberstalkers try to
> > involve third parties in the harassment. They may claim the victim has
> > harmed the stalker or his/her family in some way, or may post the
> > victim's name and telephone number in order to encourage others to
> > join the pursuit.
> >
> > False victimization. The cyberstalker will claim that the victim is
> > harassing him/her. Bocij writes that this phenomenon has been noted in
> > a number of well-known cases.
> >
> > Attacks on data and equipment. They may try to damage the victim's
> > computer by sending viruses.
> >
> > Ordering goods and services. They order items or subscribe to
> > magazines in the victim's name. These often involve subscriptions to
> > pornography or ordering sex toys then having them delivered to the
> > victim's workplace.
> >
> > Arranging to meet. Young people face a particularly high risk of
> > having cyberstalkers try to set up meetings between them.[6]
> >
> > Cyberstalkers meet or target their victims by using search engines,
> > online forums, bulletin and discussion boards, chat rooms, Wikipedia,
> > and more recently, through online communities such as MySpace,
> > Facebook, Friendster and Indymedia, a media outlet known for
> > self-publishing. They may engage in live chat harassment or flaming or
> > they may send electronic viruses and unsolicited e-mails. [7] Victims
> > of cyberstalkers may not even know that they are being stalked.
> > Cyberstalkers may research individuals to feed their obsessions and
> > curiosity. Conversely, the acts of cyberstalkers may become more
> > intense, such as repeatedly instant messaging their targets. [8]
> >
> > More commonly they will post defamatory or derogatory statements about
> > their stalking target on web pages, message boards and in guest books
> > designed to get a reaction or response from their victim, thereby
> > initiating contact. [7] In some cases, they have been known to create
> > fake blogs in the name of the victim containing defamatory or
> > pornographic content.
> >
> > When prosecuted, many stalkers have unsuccessfully attempted to
> > justify their behavior based on their use of public forums, as opposed
> > to direct contact. Once they get a reaction from the victim, they will
> > typically attempt to track or follow the victim's internet activity.
> > Classic cyberstalking behavior includes the tracing of the victim's IP
> > address in an attempt to verify their home or place of employment. [7]
> >
> > Some cyberstalking situations do evolve into physical stalking, and a
> > victim may experience abusive and excessive phone calls, vandalism,
> > threatening or obscene mail, trespassing, and physical assault.[7]
> > Moreover, many physical stalkers will use cyberstalking as another
> > method of harassing their victims.[9] [10]
> >
> > A 2007 study, led by Paige Padgett from the University of Texas Health
> > Science Center, found that there was a false degree of safety assumed
> > by women looking for love online.[11][12]
> >
> > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyberstalking
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Full-Disclosure - We believe in it.
> > Charter: http://lists.grok.org.uk/full-disclosure-charter.html
> > Hosted and sponsored by Secunia - http://secunia.com/
> >
>



Full-Disclosure - We believe in it.
Charter: http://lists.grok.org.uk/full-disclosure-charter.html Hosted and sponsored by Secunia - http://secunia.com/